Jan 2012 – Wet Night in Peterborough

As per my re-start post I am going to be re-blogging some of my posts from a site that unfortunately no longer exists in an effort to get working on my blog again. This was my second ever blog, as the title suggests a wet January night in Peterborough. Still not a lot of text as this was so early days, simply enjoying my photos at the time and trying to get some pointers on how I could be improving them. Again, the photos are untouched. The first night shots I tried with the HS20EXR. A wet and miserable night but a good chance for a few night shots of a church and Peterborough Cathedral. St John the Baptist Parish ChurchSt John the Baptist Parish Church, Cathedral Square. St John the Baptist Parish Church, Cathedral Square Peterborough Cathedral Peterborough Cathedral looking over the precinct walls from Cathedral Square. The light through the drizzle almost makes it look like a fire is in the grounds. Peterborough CathedralPeterborough Cathedral from inside the grounds. dscf0738North side of the Cathedral – like a scene from town in the early 1800’s… dscf0739…if it wasn’t for the electric lights and signs anyway.

The Raptor Foundation – First Visit

As per my previous post I am going to be re-blogging some of my posts from a site that unfortunately no longer exists in an effort to get working on my blog again.

This was my first ever blog, from my first day out with my Fujifilm HS20EXR. As this was my first trip out with the camera the photos were not necessarily all ones I would be proud of now, but in the interests of staying true to my original blog have left all the photos as they were and most of the text as it was with the possible exception of some minor typo corrections.

As a first post I did not actually add much text to this blog, simply a few photos I was please with at the time. There will be further blogs from The Raptor Foundation with what you will hopefully find a continual improvement in the standard of photography. 

The Raptor Foundation is a superb rescue centre for birds of prey and provided a great day out for me and my family. Forgive the ignorance but I cannot remember what all the birds were.

This is also the first time I got to use my HS20EXR at the start of 2012 – I did wimp out and use Auto a lot of the time so got a lot to learn but hopefully you’ll enjoy the photos anyway.

Bald Eagle
Bald Eagle
Little Owl
Little Owl
Brahminy Kite
Brahminy Kite
Bataleur Eagle
Bataleur Eagle

Kestrel

Young Bald Eagle
Young Bald Eagle

photo_066

Harris Hawk
Harris Hawk
Chilean Blue Eagle
Chilean Blue Eagle

photo_107photo_108photo_126_cropphoto_164_cropphoto_187_crop

Harris Hawk
Harris Hawk
Bataleur Eagle
Bataleur Eagle

I hope you have enjoyed these early days photos, these were unedited with the exception of the last 6 which were cropped.

Trying to restart the blog

Having not done any blog posts for a while – and having only done 3 to start off with – I am going to try and restart my blogging.

In an effort to make this easier I am going to re-blog some of my old blogs from a site that unfortunately no longer exists.

As a result these will actually be from over the last 2 and a bit years, but will hopefully allow me to get word out there.

This is simply a quick explanation of what I am doing and will include a part of this in the start of each of the following posts as they start to appear in the coming weeks.

Thanks for reading, hopefully more will be following very soon.

Neil Torr shares his thoughts on the X-A1

A couple of months ago I was lucky enough to be reviewing the Fujifilm X-A1. Despite being at the lower end of the X-series it was still an amazing camera. Read the post on the Fujifilm to find out more.

Fujifilm Corporate Blog

“Would I recommend this as a good place to start for someone ready to move on from a bridge camera? Absolutely.”

I have been fortunate enough recently to have had a Fujifilm X-A1 on review, so now I come to share my thoughts, but first of all to put this in perspective here is a bit of history about my photographic background.

Before Jan 2012 as much as I enjoyed taking photos my cameras had consisted of film compacts, simple point and shoot jobs. I had access to some digital cameras belonging to my wife after that, but again they were point and shoot compacts.

Having been to RAF Waddington International Airshow in 2011 with a compact I soon decided I wanted something that allowed me to do more with photos. As much as I fancied the idea of a DSLR I couldn’t justify the cost with so little proper…

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A Day at IWM Duxford

Just 2 weeks ago my family and I had a day at IWM Duxford. I’ve been to Duxford a few times in the past – see http://www.myfinepix.co.uk/blog/728788/577560 for photos from my last visit – and was looking forward to going again. Although perhaps not ideal for photographic opportunities (everything is very cramped to try and keep as much as possible indoors so as to prevent too much weathering damage) there is lots to see and do, even for the kids. I thought I would share some of the history. Information courtesy of the IWM website – see below. The first largest hanger housed the Airspace – a collection of aircraft telling the story of aviation in Britain and the Commonwealth. There are a number of classic aircraft of all ages from the English Electric Lightning: English Electric Lightning Or the Hawker Siddley Harrier GR.3: Hawker Siddley Harrier GR.3 Or the de Havilland Mosquito TT35: de Havilland Mosquito TT35 On this visit we bypassed hangars 2 and 3 (Flying Aircraft, and Air and Sea respectively) as we had done these hangars on the previous visit. We had done Airspace on the previous visit as well but with so many iconic aircraft didn’t want to miss it this time. We also bypassed the historic Duxford display but here is some of the general info at least for you. Duxford was one of the earliest RAF airfields and was originally built during the First World War. One of the squadrons (No 19) became the first squadron to be equipped with the Spitfire in 1938, meaning that during WWII it became a major centre for defence during the Battle of Britain. In April 1943 the airfield was handed over to the United States 8th Air Force, which had begun to arrive in Britain the previous May. RAF Duxford was officially handed back to the Royal Air Force on 1 December 1945. Duxford continued as an RAF base until it was decided that the necessary improvement costs for the airfield were too high to justify so in July 1961 the final operational flight left RAF Duxford. The future of the airfield remained uncertain until 1977 when IWM teamed with Cambridgeshire County Council and Duxford Aviation Society to buy the airfield with  view to store, restore, and display exhibits too big for its London headquarters. We also went past the hangars for the Battle of Britain display (Duxford was an important fighter base during the Battle of Britain and was home to the first squadron to be kitted with the Spitfire) and the Conservation in Action hangar – Battle of Britain we intended to see on the way back later didn’t have time, and the conservation hangar we had done on the previous visit. Though we didn’t stop in the hangars along the taxiway are a number of civil airliners and also the centre for pleasure flights. There was also a visiting Sea King helicopter out on the main airfield which took off to leave as we were going past: Sea King The next stop was the American Air Museum. This was built to commemorate the 30,000 American airmen who lost their lives in WWII whilst flying from UK bases and opened in 1997 housing the largest collection of historic US military aircraft in Europe. Aircraft range from early days bi-planes up until modern day aircraft such as the F-15 and also one of my all time favourites – the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird: Lockheed SR-71A Blackbird We continued walking to the Land Warfare exhibit. Here there was a large collection of ground based vehicles and weaponry from WWI until modern day conflicts. Land Warfare After this exhibit we had actually run out of time so we didn’t get to go back to the other hangars or go to the 1940 Operations Room. There is a huge amount to see and to be honest it is too much to do in one day, making the visit great value and leaving you wanting to go back for more. IWM Duxford is associated with English Heritage and so we get 2 for 1 entry in this case, so I can see us going back a number of times – particularly as my 5 year-old Beth seems to like it so much as well. Continue reading “A Day at IWM Duxford”

Welcome to my blog

Welcome to my blog (again). I have been interested in photography for a while but only really begun pursuing the hobby a little over two years ago with the purchase of my Fujifilm Finepix HS20EXR. Since then I have found myself trying to improve what I do particularly from my favourite subjects which include birds (birds of prey in particular), historical architecture, aircraft, and of course my family and friends. Dollar the Bald Eagle I have been sharing photos for a while on Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/NeilTorrPhotography – but have not necessarily put much thought to what I say about the photos if anything at all, which is what I aim to do here. Frecce Tricolori I will post links to websites when I can for places I visit where I can so you can take a look at the place for yourself. Burghley House More information and posts will follow as I start to develop the blog, but should you wish to see any more of my work right now please see my Facebook page. Happy viewing.

Continue reading “Welcome to my blog”